EducationEmployee ManagementLeadership

What Does Rebooking Mean to You?

When it comes to retention, the number one objective at K Charles is rebooking. More than guest loyalty or retail, rebooking is the go-to measurement to monitor business performance.

When I was still behind the chair, my rebooking ran at 87-90 per cent. How did I manage such a high rebooking? Simple: confidence. If the guest was ambivalent in any way, I gave her the card of one of my associates, because if she left without making an appointment I knew she wouldn’t be able to find a space with me when she needed to come back. That brings a particular sort of confidence. But I had a genuine belief that I could deliver what my clients wanted because of solid, ongoing education.

I approach my teams with the same assumption that they will feel similarly confident, focusing the journey from newly licensed service provider to one with an expectation of client loyalty by careful management, and with confidence-building the priority.

The turning point is three years; by then our service providers should be absolutely confident in their abilities to deliver technically and emotionally. They should believe fundamentally that their guests love what they do and want to come back. And it’s from this point that we begin closely to monitor rebooking.

When anyone’s rebooking rate drops below 50%, it triggers an additional training program that homes in on ways to build their success and includes home study and one-on-one meetings.

Almost 100% of those failing to reach our benchmark of 50% are laboring under the assumption that their guest don’t want to commit to them as their stylist or therapist. We turn that on its head: why would they risk not getting an appointment with their service provider?

And to bolster that attitude we have sessions that focus on the multi-faceted approach of delivering a service, such as:

  • Working through the client journey to identify any weaknesses that might undermine confidence and find ways to improve it.
  • Honing their product knowledge so they are confident giving advice on home care.
  • Considering ways they can encourage change so guests don’t get bored with their experience or their look.
  • Coaching about various key conversations so the service provider is relaxed and confident talking to the guest. This includes encouraging them to watch and listen to things beyond their usual sphere to broaden their interests so they can communicate across any generational and cultural gaps.
  • Teaching them to listen carefully to their client so they can pinpoint opportunities to encourage rebooking such as school recitals, reunions or even just date nights.
  • Banning any talking about themselves unless explicitly asked by the guest.
  • Giving advice on how to self-groom so they come over as an expert and drive confidence and inspiration in the guest.

What do you do to help bolster rebooking?

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Holly Vaught

Holly Vaught

A 1989 graduate of the Aveda Institute Minneapolis and third-generation beauty professional, Holly (Zapata) Vaught has worked as a licensed Hairdresser for 28 years in her family’s owned and operated Aveda Lifestyle salons. She obtained a Texas Educator License in 2004 and currently serves as Corporate Education Director and Co-Owner for three K. Charles & Co Aveda Salons in San Antonio, and two Salon Syzygies by K.Charles one in Schertz, Texas and one at the Mosaic close to downtown San Antonio as well as the Barbershop by K.Charles. Working closely with Kathy Thalman, who is company CEO and her mother, Chase, joined the family business, working in partnership with his mother and sister as Corporate Systems Director and Co-Owner. Working together they establish the Aveda Institute San Antonio in 2004 and Aveda Institute Corpus Christi in 2010. Recently selling those schools to Beauty Basics to focus on the Salons full time.

Holly’s passion for education and industry advocacy is manifested by her tireless participation in organizations important to the promotion and advancement of her profession. Eager to raise professional standards for the industry, Holly was elected to the Leadership Council for the Professional Beauty Association (PBA)in 2012 . She served the Board for Career Colleges for 6 years and led the Cosmetology School Licensing Committee for CCST. Holly previously served on the Government Relations Team for the American Association of Cosmetology Schools, the Advisory board for All Aveda Institutes. She is an excited new member at ISBN 2017. With the help of these associations she successfully lobbied for the passing of two industry-related bills at the Texas Legislature in 2013. The Razor Bill and the Mini Salon bill. In 2017 Lobbied to kill and or streamline any legislation deregulating or reducing hours for cosmetology in Texas. Holly is an avid golfer, a mother of two, and Wife of Anthony Vaught, Holly is an excellent role model for young women and men in the beauty industry.

has worked as a licensed Hairdresser for 28 years in her family’s owned and operated Aveda Lifestyle salons. She obtained a Texas Educator License in 2004 and currently serves as Corporate Education Director and Co-Owner for three K. Charles & Co Aveda Salons in San Antonio, and two Salon Syzygies by K.Charles one in Schertz, Texas and one at the Mosaic close to downtown San Antonio as well as the Barbershop by K.Charles. Working closely withKathy Thalman, who is company CEO and her mother,Chase, joined the family business, working in partnership with his mother and sister as CorporateSystems Director and Co-Owner. Working together they establish the Aveda Institute San Antonio in 2004 and Aveda Institute Corpus Christi in 2010. Recently selling those schools to focus on the Salons full time.

Holly’s passion for education and industry advocacy is manifested by her tireless participation in organizations important to the promotion and advancement of her profession. Eager to raise professional standards for the industry, Holly was elected to the Leadership Council for the Professional Beauty Association (PBA)in 2012 . She served the Board for Career Colleges for 6 years and led the Cosmetology School Licensing Committee for CCST. Holly previously served on the Government Relations Team for the American Association of Cosmetology Schools, the Advisory board for All Aveda Institutes. KCharles is an excited new member at ISBN 2017. With the help of these associations she successfully lobbied for the passing of two industry-related bills at the Texas Legislature in 2013. The Razor Bill and the Mini Salon bill. In 2017 Lobbied to kill and or streamline any legislation deregulating or reducing hours for cosmetology in Texas. Holly is an avid golfer, and a mother of two. Holly is an excellent role model for young women and men in the beauty industry.

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